Category Archives: Uncategorized

Ingrid White

Studio: Rainforest Music Studio
Instruments: Flute, Clarinet, Trumpet, Trombone
Student Ages: Beginning through Advanced Flute, Beginning Clarinet, Trumpet, and Trombone
Location: Valley
Website: Facebook @RainforestMusicStudio
Contact: rainforestmusicstudio@gmail.com, (907) 903-0810
Ingrid (Inga) White performs her primary instrument, the flute, with various groups around town including the Taku Wind Ensemble, The Amalga Chamber Orchestra, and occasionally Flutatious. Inga has her B.M. Music Performance as well as her B.M. Music Education and has taught middle school band at the Juneau Community Charter School, ukulele and songwriting with the Juneau Alaska Music Matters Program, and flute privately in her own studio.

Sara Radke Brown

Studio: Valley
Instrument: Beginning Piano, All levels voice (Classical/Opera, Musical Theatre, Cabaret, Pop)
Student Ages: All Ages
Contact: 812-361-1899; sararadkebrown@gmail.com

Sara Radke Brown completed her coursework for a Doctor of Music in Vocal Performance from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, where she also completed her Master’s degree.

Sara promotes healthy singing exercises and specializes in teaching classical vocal technique. She also teaches musical theatre which incorporates pop, belt and jazz styles. Sara accepts voice students as young as 13 years of age to adult, and all experience levels. Sara also accepts beginning piano students as young as three years of age.

In Memoriam – Ken Leghorn

The Juneau Symphony mourns the loss of Ken Leghorn, who played violin in the orchestra for 37 years. He was so many things to so many people, and we all loved him.

We collected the following remembrances of Ken’s musical life, including one from his wife, Julie. Please enjoy them. If you have a remembrance to add, send it to info@juneausymphony.org. At the bottom of the page, please also find links to other published memorials and articles about Ken.

Rick Trostel:  To me, Ken was a friend, employer, employee, outdoor buddy, musical colleague, fellow father of a daughter.  His work with the Student Symphony strings was always so helpful for the students and the orchestra as a whole – always so business-like with humor and grace added in generous amounts.  I feel so fortunate to have worked with him, played with him, and “grown up” as an adult with him.

A few years ago, he and I took a ski trip to the Juneau Icefield – five days, just the two of us.  I brought my trumpet to serenade the rocks and snow (and to stay in shape for the next Juneau Symphony concert!).  I also got to play an impromptu service for the spreading of some of his mother’s ashes on top of Nugget Peak.  Here is a picture of Ken, reflected in my trumpet bell during that ceremony.  And below it is a picture of Ken climbing to the great beyond.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bruce Simonson: It was Ken’s idea to have a youth concerto competition.  The first winner was Ajay Gullar — maybe 1989?  This competition has been very good for the symphony, and has resulted in showcasing many of Juneau’s talented youth.

From Nancy Darigo:  This is indeed very sad news.  I heard of it at the last concert from Justine and could hardly believe it could happen to such an otherwise healthy active guy with so much to offer in life.  Although I knew him from playing music, it was the mutual interest in outdoor activities that we seemed to connect on.  Ken was the 1st person that ever hosted me playing in the JSO.  He seemed to know everyone in town; he took me along to someone’s birthday party, and casually made skiing plans after running into a friend on the stairs.  I remember being  impressed by what a nice bunch of active folks (my age!) lived in Juneau because of him.  On a subsequent JSO trip, though I stayed somewhere else, Rick (trumpet) was assigned to drive me and offered to go kayaking, which ment driving over to Ken’s garage full of toys to borrow the gear.  I also remember Ken hauling all the Californians out to the glacier last year in a multi-vehicle field trip after having brunch at his house – a fun time was had!  Even though a couple years might go by between when I’d run into him, he always greeted me like a long-lost friend with genuine interest in what’s been going on.  I will miss him and always think of him as a Juneau icon.  My sincerest sympathies to Julie and family.

Sally Schlichting: He used to perform in his Xtratuffs on stage with the JSO.

Amy Lujan: Ken will be sorely missed.  He was one of the friendliest and most welcoming members of the symphony to me, and it’s incredible that he played in so many concerts, while also working on so many other projects for our community (which I learned much more about at the JCF reception!)

I also go to know Ken when we were working on the Music Director search, and his interest in making the best possible choice for the JSO’s future really came through.

Most impressive was his hospitality to our visiting musicians.  Those I’ve talked with who had an opportunity to go to one of the events at his house had great things to say about Ken and Julie, and the hospitality he provided.

Ken will truly be missed.

Guohua Xia: We miss Ken; all the young musicians miss him.   When we have rehearsals and performances, I always look for Ken.  In the last few years, Ken helped the Juneau Student Symphony, string ensemble, Mini-fiddlers and Suzuki violin kids.   He tuned violins, set up places, and managed the stage.   He was there for performances at community day, Folk Festival, Chamber Music Night, fundraisers and recitals.   Ken did it all without being asked.

At many rehearsals and performances he would sit with the kids and coach them as they played.   Our last performance was at Auke Bay — the Juneau Student Symphony concert in January.  Ken helped tune the instruments and then played at the concert.  He played with the string ensemble but not the student symphony — he told me he wished he could play with all of the programs, but he was tired after the ensemble music due to his illness.     The Juneau young string players  remember all that he did for us and all the progress we made.  We miss Ken’s love,  his professionalism, and his contribution.

Gregg Rice: I just wanted to extend my sympathies to the orchestra over the loss of Ken Leghorn.  I haven’t played with the orchestra for a few years, but I will always remember Ken’s friendly face, and welcoming hospitality when I would fly up from Seattle to join the symphony. He was such a positive, cheerful individual and tremendous asset to the orchestra and to Juneau.

Kyle Wiley Pickett: When I was hired in 2000 to be the conductor of the Juneau Symphony, I was immediately impressed with the generosity and kindness of the people of Juneau. Friends and strangers alike invited me to stay in their homes and drive their cars, people were always including me in their social plans, and Juneau-ites were eager to show off their great city and its beautiful natural treasures to my family and me. The community of Juneau has a great enthusiasm to connect with others, to share meals and experiences and conversation, and to make this world a better place by experiencing life together. Juneau’s enthusiastic and generous spirit is truly remarkable at the community level. And on an individual level, this spirit was personified by and perhaps perfected in Ken Leghorn.

I stayed at Ken’s house many times in my earlier years with the Symphony. We talked about music, hiking, and politics. I loved the enthusiasm Ken had for so many different topics, and he was a very easy person to be around with his casual attitude, deep intelligence, and quick smile. He was also possibly the most spectacularly extroverted individual I have ever known, and I say that as a pretty extroverted person, myself. I cannot tell you how often when I was staying at their house that Ken would come back from a walk and announce that, on the way downtown, he’d run into a congressperson, whom he’d invited to dinner, and someone he’d once kayaked with, whom he’d also invited to dinner, and also a family from school, all of whom he’d invited to dinner, and then waved at their across-the-street neighbor, who had already had dinner but would come over later for dessert. And then one by one those folks would show up for dinner, and we’d sit and linger long over the dinner table, talking and laughing and being together.

Our family learned who we wanted to be by watching the way Ken filled his house with friends. Our kids will sometimes say, “Who’s coming to dinner tonight?” and we joke that we’re bringing up our kids to be as social as Ken Leghorn. We haven’t always succeeded, but it truly is always on our minds to be as open and generous and warm as Ken, and to bring people into our home to be with each other and share our lives, just as he did.

Julie York Coppens: I spoke with Ken’s sister Lisa yesterday. Her memories from childhood are foggy, but she thinks Ken started playing violin around the age of 10, and agrees that it was their mother, Nancy, who fostered in them both a love of music. Nancy arranged for them to take lessons through the extension program of the New England Conservatory of Music, took them to many concerts and operas over the years, and encouraged home practice and performance. In Nancy’s final days, when she was being cared for at home in Ashland, Ore., Ken remembered listening to opera recordings with her and smiling as this woman in her 80s suddenly looked like a teen-ager again, swooning over photos of favorite singers like Russian Baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky: “He has such kissable lips!,” she would sigh. Of course Ken looked just as handsome in his concert attire, and that’s certainly one of the ways I will enjoy remembering him. The absolute concentration I saw in Ken when he practiced or performed a difficult phrase — maybe I’m wrong, but he seemed to be working harder, and having more fun, doing that than almost anything else, including scaling a cliff or tracking a bear.

Ken’s father (still living on Cape Cod, though very frail) is a decorated WWII veteran, one of the pilots who flew reconnaissance missions over Normandy before the D-Day invasion, and his later innovations in optics technology and satellite espionage made him a key player during the Cold War: his images helped U.S. military and intelligence officials understand the Soviet arsenal and avoid open conflict. He was a lifelong advocate for peace and a very successful businessman in his day. I know Mr. Leghorn supported Ken’s interest in music, and probably had a hand in Ken’s purchase at age 22 of a Pressenda 1848 violin (worth $2,000 in 1977 dollars), but his own passions lay elsewhere.

Ken informally taught or coached a number of Juneau kids on violin over the years, but I don’t know any details about that. He’s definitely the reason my young violinist still plays at age 12; among the many books Ken should have written is a guide for parents on coaxing reluctant music students to practice and making the most of that time. Some of our most cherished family memories are of recital duets and trios played with Ken, and evenings at home stumbling through (I was the one stumbling, on piano) Suzuki pieces or fiddle tunes together. “The Lovers’ Waltz” by Jay Ungar and Molly Mason was our favorite duet. Ken always wanted me to learn the piano part to a Vivaldi concerto so I could accompany him, but I never did — way too hard!

[Ken] did share one funny story with me about his year in high school studying abroad in France, when he completely bombed a conservatory jury performance: Ken took his mark, nodded to the auditors behind the table, started the piece, played a few bars… then skipped to the end, hit the final note, bowed and walked out. He had no idea what happened after that, whether the jury burst out laughing or just shook their heads in bafflement, but we used to say that U.S.-French relations were never the same. However they did let his daughter Yana into the country for her own junior year some decades later, so I guess all was forgiven.

More about Ken and his amazing life:

Official obituary
Juneau Empire article 4/21/2017
Juneau Empire arts profile, February 2000
Juneau Community Foundation honors Ken Leghorn (video)

Juneau’s Jedi Knights

If you know Troy Quinn, you know that our conductor is not only a huge John Williams fan, he is also a Star Wars fanatic.  In fact, our final concert of the season on June 10th and 11th  will celebrate the works of this master of Hollywood film scores. You can count on plenty of Star Wars music, including The Force Awakens; plus we will also be performing music from other John Williams films including Indiana Jones, Home Alone (including a choral piece with Alaska Youth Choir), Lincoln, Far and Away, The Patriot, Hook, and ET.

Juneau’s Jedi Knights will play a key role in helping us present this exciting concert, which will be costly to produce. Not only is the music very expensive, we will be flying in some very special players to help out, including Hollywood studio musicians who have recorded this music for the actual films. Income from the Jedi Knights will go directly to supporting this concert.

How can you join Juneau’s Jedi Knights? It’s easy. Look for a special table in the JDHS lobby at the spring concert. We will also be at Community Day at UAS on Saturday, May 20th. When you donate $100 or more to our special fund to support the pops concert, you will automatically be enrolled in the Jedi Knights and be on the list to receive a very special mug, complete with a picture of Troy and Yoda, to commemorate your membership.

OR contact the office and we will be happy to enroll you.

Artistic Support Material

Social media links

Juneau Symphony Facebook

Juneau Symphony Instagram

Sample Posters

Concert Photos

Juneau Symphony American Roots 2017

  • Juneau Symphony
    American Roots 2017. Photo by Kurt Smith.
  • Juneau Symphony
    American Roots 2017. Photo by Kurt Smith.
  • Juneau Symphony
    American Roots 2017. Photo by Kurt Smith.
  • Juneau Symphony
    American Roots 2017. Photo by Kurt Smith.
  • Juneau Symphony
    American Roots 2017. Photo by Kurt Smith.
  • Juneau Symphony
    American Roots 2017. Photo by Kurt Smith.
  • Juneau Symphony
    American Roots 2017. Photo by Kurt Smith.
  • Juneau Symphony
    American Roots 2017. Photo by Kurt Smith.
  • Juneau Symphony
    American Roots 2017. Photo by Kurt Smith.

Juneau Symphony Pops Concert 2016

  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.
  • Pops 2016. Photo by Bob Eastaugh.

Music in the Schools concert 2016

  • Music in the Schools 2016. Photo by Scarlett Adam.
  • Music in the Schools 2016. Photo by Scarlett Adam.
  • Music in the Schools 2016. Photo by Scarlett Adam.
  • Music in the Schools 2016. Photo by Scarlett Adam.
  • Music in the Schools 2016. Photo by Scarlett Adam.
  • Music in the Schools 2016. Photo by Scarlett Adam.
  • Music in the Schools 2016. Photo by Scarlett Adam.
  • Music in the Schools 2016. Photo by Scarlett Adam.
  • Music in the Schools 2016. Photo by Scarlett Adam.
  • Music in the Schools 2016. Photo by Scarlett Adam.
  • Music in the Schools 2016. Photo by Scarlett Adam.
  • Music in the Schools 2018. Photo by Michael Penn.
  • Music in the Schools 2018. Photo by Michael Penn.
  • Music in the Schools 2018. Photo by Michael Penn.

Symphony Showcase 2016

  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Mendenhall Quartet: Lindsay Clark, Heidi Brook, Ruth Hogle, Sophia Butler. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Heidi Brook. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Lindsay Clark. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Colleen Torrence. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Grace Lee. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Grace Lee, Lisa Ray, Colleen Torrence. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Kathryn Kurtz. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Kyle Farley-Robinson. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Lisa Ray. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Lorrie Heagy. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Lorrie Heagy, Ruth Hogle. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Lorrie Heagy, Ruth Hogle. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Meghan Johnson. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Lisa Ray, Colleen Torrence, Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Mendenhall Quartet: Lindsay Clark, Heidi Brook, Ruth Hogle, Sophia Butler. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Mendenhall Quartet: Lindsay Clark, Heidi Brook, Ruth Hogle, Sophia Butler. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Ruth Hogle. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Ruth Hogle. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Ruth Hogle, Sophia Butler. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Sally Schlichting. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Tim Ayer, Sally Schlichting. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Sally Schlichting. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Sara Radke Brown. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Tim Ayer. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Steve Tada, Ken Leghorn, Heather O'Claray, Kristin Garot, Sara Radke Brown, Meghan Johnson, Sophia Butler, Judith Mitchell. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Steve Tada, Ken Leghorn, Heather O'Claray, Kristin Garot, Sara Radke Brown, Meghan Johnson, Sophia Butler, Judith Mitchell. Photo by Ezra Strong.
  • Symphony Showcase 2016. Ken Leghorn, Heather O'Claray, Sara Radke Brown. Photo by Ezra Strong.

Press

New conductor

Juneau Symphony review

Reflections on Symphony’s Peace & Deliverance

Trevar Fiscus, winner of Youth Solo Competition

Testimonials — Visiting musicians, winter 2017

“On behalf of the entire JYC staff, I’d like to thank [the musician]  for a wonderful visit. The students were engaged and asked great questions. It really expanded our students’ cultural education. “

— teacher, Johnson Youth Center detention center

“Lisa and Candace were FABULOUS!!!!   All three fifth grade classes attended the visit in the library. We had about 75 students.  The choice of music they played was great and we had some wonderful questions asked.  The students were quiet and very focused during the visit.”

— 5th grade teacher, Auke Bay Elementary

“Before Tammy came into my classroom, my kids were pretty blah-blah about going to the symphony tomorrow.  But, after Tammy came in, all I have heard all day long is, “I can’t wait to go to the symphony!” from almost every kid . . . over and over . . . all day long!  Thank you!”

— 5th grade teacher, Gastineau Elementary

“You did such an amazing and beautiful job playing – so gracious and friendly with the kids, too.  I loved how you took the kids through thinking of the instruments and how to make the sounds with their voices or clapping.  Our daily clean-up song (Ode To Joy) is near and dear to us, so that was a perfect way to make a connection right away.  We absolutely loved the fiddle songs, too.  Thank you so very much for taking time out of your day to share your talent with us.  I know it made a big impression for the kids to see and hear you play.  Your quiet tune at the end was such a calming, sweet way to end your visit.  We appreciated the opportunity to experience your music!”

–1st grade teacher, Gastineau Elementary

BOARD MEETING DOCUMENTS 2016-2017

Back to Directors Only Board page

June 20th, 2017
Minutes
Consent Agenda

May 16th, 2017
Minutes
Consent Agenda

April 18th, 2017
Minutes
Consent Agenda

March 21st, 2017
Minutes
Consent Agenda

February 21st, 2017
DRAFT Minutes
President’s Report
Consent Agenda

January 17th, 2017
Minutes
Consent Agenda

November 15th, 2016
Minutes
Consent Agenda

Annual Meeting (October 18, 2016)
Minutes
Agenda

October 18th, 2016
Minutes
Consent Agenda

September 20th, 2016
Minutes
Consent Agenda

August 16th, 2016
Minutes
Consent Agenda

July 26th, 2016
Minutes
Consent Agenda

Juneau Symphony Wildlife Cruise

When: Saturday September, 3rd 2016, 2:00pm – 5:00pm (Boarding begins at 1:30 pm)
Where:  Don Statter Public Boat Harbor in Auke Bay
Tickets: $75 each, available at Hearthside Books, the JACC, or online.

image004Meet at the Don Statter Public Boat Harbor in Auke Bay (by DeHarts). Catamaran begins boarding at 1:30pm, we sail promptly at 2:00.

Savor the last little bit of summer and get out of town for a delightful afternoon of whale watching, live music, food and wine on our 2016 Wildlife Cruise. The experienced crew of Allen Marine Tours will guide us through the island-studded waters of Stephen’s Passage to view Southeast Alaska’s spectacular wildlife including humpback and killer whales, Steller sea lions, Dall’s porpoise, and harbor seals. On board the catamaran you can enjoy the all-you-can-eat buffet while sipping a variety of imported wines, courtesy of Specialty Imports. and listening to live music from string ensemble members Sophia Butler (violin), Katie Kroko (viola), Meghan Johnson (cello), and Andrew Israelson (bass). The ensemble members are current and former UAS students earning a Master of Arts in Teaching and working in the Juneau Alaska Music Matters (JAMM) program. Naturalist Mary Willson will also be there to answer all your wildlife questions.

Tickets are on sale now! They are available at the usual outlets: Hearthside Books, the JACC, and online by clicking below.

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Current Season

All mainstage concerts are at Juneau Douglas High School Auditorium.

Shaken Not Stirred: The Music of James Bond

June 2 at 8 p.m. (7 p.m. Concert Conversation)

June 3
 at 3 p.m. (2 p.m. Concert Conversation)

The name’s Bond… James Bond. For over 50 years, the dashing and dangerous British spy movies have been charming audiences with some of the greatest music ever written. From Oscar winning composers John Barry to Marvin Hamlisch, come experience the Juneau Symphony as we shake (not stir) things up playing all your favorites, including Goldfinger, Skyfall, and For Your Eyes Only, including a few surprises!

Purchase Tickets here.

Sublime and Sacred

April 7 & 8

Ralph Vaughan Williams  English Folk Song Suite
Arthur Honegger  Pastorale d’été
Ralph Vaughan Williams   Antiphon from Five Mystical Songs
Gabriel Fauré Requiem, Op. 48 – with soloists Jorell Williams, baritone, and Zanaida Robles, soprano

Jorell Williams is an American operatic baritone with a wide variety of experience from standard repertoire to premiere pieces. In the 2017-2018 season, Mr. Williams returns to the Caramoor International Music Festival as Nardo in a remount of On-Site Opera’s production of Mozart’s La finta giardiniera, Dr. Falke in Finger Lakes Opera’s production of Die Fledermaus, and will make his role and company debut as Le Genie Oroès in the American premiere of Rameau’s Sympathie (or Acante et Céphise) with Victory Hall Opera. In concert, he will appear as soloist in Faure’s Requiem with the Juneau Symphony Orchestra, Leslie Adams’ song cycle The Wider View with the Harlem Chamber Players, Handel’s Messiah with the Branford Chorale, Jazz Trumpeter Alphonso Horne’s African Princess Suite at the Triad, premieres new works by Libby Larsen and Daren Hagen with the Phoenix Concerts in New York City, and debuts with the Five Boroughs Music Festival at National Sawdust.

 

As a concert soprano soloist, studio vocalist for lm and television, and professional ensemble singer, Dr. Robles has sung throughout the United States, and in parts of Europe, New Zealand, and Australia, performing professionally under the batons of such conductors as Charles Dutoit, Esa-Pekka Salonen, John Williams, John Mauceri, Leonard Slatkin, Gustavo Dudamel, Je rey Kahane, Grant Gershon, and Michael Tilson Thomas. She has performed background vocals for various artists including Josh Groban, the Rolling Stones, Andrea Bocelli, and Juanes. She has also worked as a singer and pianist on the hit Fox Television series “Glee” and as a singer in performances of “Game of Thrones Live” in Los Angeles. Her lm credits include “Tinkerbell: Pirate Fairy,” “Godzilla,” “Minions,” “Creed,” and “Star Wars: The Last Jedi.”

 

 

Symphony Showcase

         March 17 at 8 p.m. at Aldersgate Methodist Church

         March 18 at 3 p.m. at Northern Light Church 

         Yagisawa Coloratura for flute quartet – Stevi Spinka, Lisa Ray, Colleen Torrence, Sandy Fortier, flutes
         Poulenc Sonata for horn, trumpet and trombone –  Bill Paulick, horn, Rick Trostel, trumpet, Jared Lear, trombone
         Duet for clarinet and piano – Beth Leibowitz and Robert Cohen
         Prokofiev Violin Sonata No. 1 in F minor (1st and 3rd movements) –  Lindsay Clark, violin, Jon Hays, piano
         Luigi Bassi Fantasia da concerto su motivi del “Rigoletto” di G. Verdi – Megan Watson, clarinet; Jon Hays, piano

Shakespeare in Love

January 27 at 8 p.m. (7 p.m. Concert Conversation) 

January 28 at 3 p.m. (2 p.m. Concert Conversation)

Felix Mendelssohn Wedding March from A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Nino Rota Romeo and Juliet: A Time For Us
Stephen Warbeck Suite from Shakespeare in Love
Robert Schumann  Piano Concerto in A Minor, Op. 54, movement 1
with soloist Kyle Farley-Robinson, winner of the 2016-2017 Youth Solo Competition
Sergei Prokofiev Selections from Romeo and Juliet Suite No. 2 Montagues and Capulets
Piotr Tchaikovsky Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture

Opening Night

October 21 at 8 p.m. (7 p.m. Concert Conversation) 

October 22 at 3 p.m. (2 p.m. Concert Conversation)

Jean Sibelius  Finlandia
Ralph Vaughan Williams  The Lark Ascending
Johannes Brahms  Symphony No. 3 in F major<>

2018-2019 dates

We are grateful to Community Schools and the Juneau School District for their cooperation in securing weekends for our mainstage concerts next season. We are happy to announce the following concert dates:

Fall: November 10-11
Winter: January 26-27
Symphony Showcase: March 16-17
Spring: April 6-7
Summer: June 8-9

Sophia Butler

Instruments: viola, violin all levels
Ages: all ages
Locations: Downtown and the Valley
Website: butler37.wix.com/portfolio
Contact: 952-715-1955, sophia.fiddlinaround@gmail.com

Sophia graduated from St. Olaf College with a Bachelor of Arts in Music. While at St. Olaf, she studied violin and played in the St. Olaf Orchestra, winner of the 2014 American Prize. She played viola in a number of chamber groups and also enjoyed taking voice lessons and singing in the Chapel Choir. Also during her undergraduate, Sophia studied abroad in Northern Ireland where she played a lot of Irish folk and fiddle music. Sophia now lives in Juneau, working with Juneau Alaska Music Matters and finishing a one year Masters of Teaching degree at UAS. She plays viola in the Juneau Symphony as well as in the Mendenhall String Quartet.

Sophia has experience teaching very young children up through adult players. She is interested in fostering good technique and posture while ensuring students retain a passion for playing. While very familiar with the Suzuki method, Sophia supplements her pedagogy with folk music, etudes, scale methods, and other repertoire that keeps students engaged.